Narrative Structure: The Hero’s Journey

Whenever I think of The Hero’s Journey, I think Star Wars: A New Hope. It encapsulates The Hero’s Journey quite nicely. This narrative structure can be split into three acts, similar to the Three-Act Structure, but with more subplots than just pinch points. In a way, one could even think of the plot points as pinch points within The Hero’s Journey.

Photo by Tiểu Linh

This narrative structure can be broken down into 12 plot points, each of which can be divided into those three acts, as aforementioned. You’ll find that some of the plot points coincide with basic plot structure.

  1. The Ordinary World
    This is your opening. We, as readers, are introduced to the characters, the setting, and what their ordinary lives are like. This is the status quo.
  2. The Call of Adventure
    In the Three-Act Structure, we would call this the inciting incident/event. This is when we hear Leia’s famous line: “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope.” The Galactic Empire has finally reached the Outer Rim, and has made an impact on Luke’s normal world.
  3. Refusal of the Call
    This is just as it sounds. Luke initially declines the call, instead looking for his new R2 unit just so he doesn’t get in trouble with Uncle Owen. Luke doubts his own abilities, anyway, and claims it’s too far from him for him to be of any help.
  4. Meeting the Mentor
    While stages three and four blend a bit, but Obi-Wan explains the force, Jedi, and a bit about Luke’s father. Luke initially refuses, but after returning home and finding his aunt and uncle murdered, he agrees to train with Obi-Wan.
  5. Crossing the Threshold
    The cantina scene makes up the “Crossing the Threshold” plot point. Someone picks a fight with Luke in the cantina, and he’s utterly out of his element.
  6. Tests, Allies, Enemies
    Luke gains more allies, Han Solo and Chewbacca, who agree to take them to Alderaan. The Stormtroopers try to stop them as they leave.
  7. Approach to the Inmost Cave
    Here, our hero nearly reaches their goal. This is when Luke and the gang come near the Death Star after discovering that Alderaan no longer exists. As the iconic line goes: “I have a bad feeling about this.”
  8. The Ordeal
    Rescuing Princess Leia represents “The Ordeal” for Luke. The Ordeal is a test our hero must overcome. However, Luke also loses something: We witness the death of Obi-Wan.
  9. Reward/Seize the Sword
    In most stories based on The Hero’s Journey, this is where our hero would be rewarded. Something important is obtained by our hero, and victory is in sight.
  10. The Road Back
    Luke joins the rebel fleet as a pilot, and his aim is to destroy the Death Star. Our hero realizes that their initial goal may not be the final hurdle.
  11. Resurrection
    Luke has changed. He learns to trust the force, and he uses it to destroy the Death Star (also thanks to a quick save by Han Solo). This is Luke’s first steps towards becoming a Jedi.
  12. Return with the Elixir
    Basking in their triumph, our hero returns to their ordinary world—or as ordinary as it can be. It doesn’t have to be a literal elixir; it can represent our hero’s success (such as in the form of Leia awarding Luke and Han medals. Also, I never understood why Chewbacca didn’t get one).

These are the 12 plot points in The Hero’s Journey. As we saw, the definitive lines of the different plot points can blur together.

For more information on narrative structure, see my post: The 7 Types of Narrative Structure!

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